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Occupations

The following are the various occupations membrs in my family tree have been involved in. These are the occupations recorded in birth, marriage and death certificates along with census returns. It is quite possible they had other jobs as well, but these have not been recorded anywhere.

Where possible I have tried to give an explanation of the occupation. I believe the information I have presented here is correct, but if you know different, or you can help me with a description of those occupations I don't have any information for, then please contact me.


Agricultural Labourer

Agricultural Labourer

Most of us will have an ancestor who worked as an agricultural labourer at some point. In fact, the 1851 census records 1,460,896 people working as an “ag lab”, farm servant or shepherd – more than in any other field of employment. Only in 1871 did domestic service overtake it to the top spot.

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Architect and Surveyor

Assistant Jam Bottler

Assistant Teacher

Assy Fitter

Baister

Baker

Bakers Van Boy

Barrack Labourer

Blacksmith

Blacksmith

Someone who worked iron with forge and hammer.

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Boatman

Boatman

Someone who worked on river and canal boats. In some cases it also refers to someone who owned their own fishing boat or who worked on such vessels.

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Boot and Shoe Shopkeeper

Boot Mender

Brewery Labourer

Butcher

Carter

Carter

Someone who carries or conveys goods in a cart.

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Charwoman

Charwoman

A woman hired by the day to do odd jobs, usually cleaning, in a house - as still used today and in use as early as 1596. The word "chare" or "char" was used to describe an odd job.

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Checker on Railway

Cloth Piecener

Cloth Piecener

Someone who worked in a spinning mill, employed to piece together any threads which broke (usually a child or woman).

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Cloth Weaver

Cloth Weaver

A weaver of cotton, cloth, silk etc. Usually refers to mill work.

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